The summer holidays can be an ideal opportunity for young people to get work experience. Whether you already know what career you’d like to pursue or are weighing your options, work experience is a great starting point. From volunteering to finding a summer job, developing your skills and gaining experience is vital to staying ahead of the curve.

The Families Programme supports young people (aged 16-24) who have at least one parent who has served or still serves in the British military. Employment advisors can connect young people to events, further training, and employment opportunities. The charity offers an array of events, resources, and advice to help you kickstart your career!

Top tips for finding volunteering or work experience

Sian Kerr, a young person’s employment advisor, offers her advice on how young people can find work experience this summer. She says:

Search your local high street

As a first port of call talk to local charity shops, as they often take on volunteers. Alternatively, if you are aiming for industry-specific experience, contact local businesses. So many jobs never get advertised. Approaching businesses speculatively to offer your services is a great habit to develop.

Look at noticeboards

Shops such as newsagents, supermarkets, libraries, and community centres often have noticeboards. You can scour them for the latest vacancies in your area. Facebook groups are also a great place to start finding opportunities.

Join local groups

Most areas have local interest groups, and many need volunteers to support their activities. Consider your hobbies and interests when searching for groups. Finding scout/guide groups in your area is a good starting point.

Let job sites do the hard work for you

Many job sites include volunteering opportunities. Try searching for volunteer roles on sites such as Indeed, Charity Job, and Youth Capital. Also, Youth Employment can help you find local volunteering opportunities and work experience.

Volunteer with a charity

Many charities are always looking for volunteer support. Think about what interests or excites you. Then narrow down your choices by researching local initiatives or groups. Next, contact them to see if they have opportunities in your area. You can look for volunteer work experience with the National Association for Voluntary and Community Action (NAVCA) or the Royal Voluntary Service. Alternatively you can gain virtual work experiences with providers like Hundo or Forage.

Stay ahead of the competition

Talk to your school’s careers department about finding work experience before you break up for the summer holiday. Teachers and advisors may have connections to summer jobs, volunteering, or other opportunities. Make the most of the people around you including your parents, siblings, and friends they may be able to help.

Be prepared

Before you start applying for work experience or volunteer work, prepare by writing a CV. Many organisations will ask you to provide a CV so they can understand who you are. Register with us today for resources, guidance, and support from an employment advisor.

How does the Forces Employment Charity support young people?

By registering with the Families Programme, young people are paired with an employment advisor who can assist them in crafting their first CV, discovering local opportunities, and broadening their career aspirations.

One such success story involves a military child who registered with the Families Programme. Initially, she had a basic CV, which her advisor helped enhance. Despite her best efforts, she was unsuccessful in securing paid roles. Her advisor then recommended that she look for volunteering experience at local charity shops to strengthen her CV and learn transferrable skills.

Following this advice, she revamped her CV and successfully secured a volunteering position with Oxfam in early June. Reflecting on her experience, she said volunteering “really helped me with my customer service skills, my confidence dealing with different situations, and my efficiency.”

After completing her volunteering stint, she and her advisor reviewed and incorporated the new skills and work experiences into her CV. This thorough preparation paid off, as she subsequently secured paid employment as a food and beverage assistant at a prestigious hotel chain.

What’s the next step?

If you are a military child with at least one parent who has served or still serves in the Armed Forces, register with us today! Make the most of the summer holidays to gain work experience, develop new skills, and broaden your support network. Our employment advisors are here to help you kickstart your employment journey.

Navigating the career landscape can be particularly challenging for military spouses and partners, who often encounter unique obstacles in their professional journeys. Yet, with tailored support and the right opportunities, these challenges can be transformed into stepping stones for success. The empowering stories of Reva and Sara Hilton showcase the power of dedicated support in unlocking new career prospects.

Overcoming barriers and embracing new opportunities: empowering Reva

 

What were your biggest challenges when you registered with the Forces Employment Charity?

Meet Reva, a military spouse and TechVets member who faced significant hurdles when she moved to the UK. “I was unfamiliar with the job market itself. I was also uncertain about my skills and the direction that I wanted to take further,” Reva recalls. Adjusting to a new country while trying to find employment proved to be a daunting task.

How did your Families Employment Advisor help you find your new job?

Reva sought assistance from the Families Programme, where she was assigned an employment advisor, Sarah Peñaluna. Sarah provided comprehensive support, helping Reva navigate the UK job market. “Not only did my advisor Sarah help me by optimising the job hunt, reviewing and preparing my CV, and refining my interview skills, but she also recommended a full-time funded cyber security course as I’d mentioned that I was looking for a change in career path—I am currently doing the course,” Reva explains.

Sarah’s assistance extended beyond immediate job search strategies. Sarah helped to empower Reva through meaningful support which boosted her confidence and self-esteem. Reva explains, “My employment advisor helped me with CV preparation, interview techniques, networking advice, and training and education opportunities.” This tailored support gave Reva the confidence and skills necessary to pursue her new career goals.

How did getting a new job empower you?

Securing a new job and enrolling in the cyber security course has profoundly impacted Reva’s life. “My job, along with the course I’m studying, has brought in so much stability in my life, along with confidence and self-assurance for which I’ll be forever grateful to Sarah and the Forces Employment Charity,” Reva expresses. The dedicated support from the Forces Employment Charity and Sarah’s expert guidance has been pivotal in Reva’s successful transition to a new career, showcasing the charity’s effectiveness in supporting military spouses.

Navigating uncertainty and developing self-confidence: empowering Sara Hilton

 

What were your biggest challenges when you registered with the Forces Employment Charity?

Meet Sara Hilton, a military spouse who turned to the Families Programme and TechVets for support in overcoming significant career obstacles. “I faced a lack of direction, an overwhelming choice of courses and career paths, self-confidence issues, and imposter syndrome,” Sara recalls. Navigating these challenges while seeking a new career path in a technical field felt daunting and uncertain.

How did your Families Employment Advisor help you find your new job?

Sara found invaluable support from her employment advisor, Tanja. “Tanja gave great CV support with a fantastic insight into the best way to write, layout, and distribute it. She was always there if I needed anything and super excited for me when I shared my news with her!” Sara explains. Tanja’s assistance went beyond CV preparation, encompassing training and education opportunities, links to local employers, and general support. “I could not have done it without you and TechVets. Thank you so much!” Sara expresses her gratitude.

Through the combined efforts of the Forces Employment Charity and TechVets, Sara received tailored support that addressed her specific needs. “My employment advisor helped me with CV preparation, training and education opportunities, links to local employers, and amazing general support and help,” Sara notes. This comprehensive assistance equipped her with the tools and confidence to pursue a new career in cyber security.

How did getting a new job empower you?

Securing a new job in cyber security has transformed Sara’s life. “It will open up so many opportunities as I build and develop my new career and will allow us as a family to enjoy more time together as I will no longer be working weekends. It has helped me with my self-confidence and my abilities in general,” Sara shares. The impact on her self-identity has been profound: “I am in my late thirties, and since having my three children, I have felt just like ‘Mum,’ but now I am doing this for myself, and it feels amazing!”

Looking ahead, Sara is thrilled about her new career’s endless opportunities. “It is an endless list of possible opportunities within cyber, and I am very excited to get going!” she exclaims. The support from the Forces Employment Charity and TechVets has not only enabled Sara to secure a new job. Still, it has also set her on a path filled with promising prospects, significantly enhancing her personal and professional life.

Would you like to know more?

If you are a military spouse or partner of a still-serving personnel or veteran – are divorced, separated, or bereaved, we can support you on your journey into employment. Register today!

One of the benefits of joining our next event, Pathways into Financial Services on 4 June in London is that you’ll be able to meet those who have served and hear about their own experiences in sourcing civilian employment. The Forces Employment Charity met former British Army Officer, Craig Calkin, who is now a Vice President at BNY Mellon in its Third-Party Governance and Controls domain. His primary focus is on ensuring compliance to extant vendor management policies.

Prior to joining BNY Mellon in March 2024, Craig was commissioned into the Royal Logistic Corps and spent 30 years employed as a logistics officer within the British Army. Upon leaving the Army he worked in different private and public sector roles.

What made you consider a career in this sector?

To be completely honest, after 30 years in the Army, I wasn’t really sure where I would ‘fit’ in civilian life. I had read a lot of different pieces of advice from Service leavers and held discussions in many quarters prior to leaving but nothing specifically jumped out at me. After trying a few different things over a six-year period, an ex-Army friend suggested that I investigate employment opportunities within the financial sector.  Initially, I never thought that this would be a viable option for me, as I had no experience nor perceived skill set in finance/banking, but the more I learned about the multiple opportunities in support roles within the sector, the more sense it made to me.

Why choose BNY Mellon?

Another ex-Army friend informed me that BNY Mellon was starting a new and bespoke ‘VETNET’ hiring system. I made some enquiries and looked at the sort of opportunities which may exist within the bank for someone with my skill set and background. I was really pleased with what I saw and submitted my CV into their system.

How do you feel your skills from the Armed Forces community converted across to your role?

My new role with the bank is deeply involved with speaking to people all over the globe ensuring that our vendor relationships are compliant with BNY Mellon’s governance procedures. Key to the role is the ability to assimilate information quickly, particularly processes and procedures (SOPs), and then facilitate the building of effective relationships between the bank’s vendor engagement managers and the vendors themselves ensuring compliance with the rules.  I feel that my ability to communicate with all manner of people effectively, learned in no small way in the Army, underpins my primary role.

What are your personal positives to your role?

My skills, both in logistically oriented academic qualifications and my ability to plan, particularly in planning for contingencies, have prepared me perfectly for my role. I also love the fact that the vast majority of my time is spent talking with people all over the globe. I really had no idea how comfortable I would so soon become when I joined BNY Mellon but the ease with which I am finding my primary role has astounded me. Looking back, I can’t believe that I harboured such reservations about working with a global leading investment bank.

Any challenges – and how did you overcome them? (If any)

Once again, to be completely honest, I don’t believe that I transitioned out of the Army at all well.  Thirty years is a long time to do anything and, although I do regard myself as a mentally agile and very flexible person, in the Army I developed many traits and habits that I now need to be aware of when dealing with those who have never served. The biggest challenge for me is to try to contextualise my many experiences into relatable, professional terms when dealing with my civilian colleagues.

What tips would you share with anyone considering a role in financial services?

This is the easiest question of all to answer. The financial services environment has nearly every conceivable function that the military does. Think about what you enjoy doing within your military role, and with a few obvious and solely military-oriented exceptions, you will find it in financial services. Free your mind and look for what will make you happy. I joined the Bank at the age of 54 having never been in the financial sector whatsoever previously and highly recommend it.

Sign up to Pathways into Financial Services, and other events!

Register to livestream Pathways into Financial Services today (registrations to attend in person are now closed). Living in Scotland? We are also running a regional evening event in Glasgow at Barclays on Tuesday 18 June.

Consider also our fully funded LinkedIn Essentials course on Wednesday 5 June by Lincoln Coutts. Afterwards, you’ll be all set to build/refresh your own LinkedIn account!

Our ‘Pathways into…’ events are part of Op PROSPER

The Forces Employment Charity provides one of three workstreams of Op PROSPER. A government-led programme through the Office for Veterans’ Affairs, awarded to us through the Armed Forces Covenant Fund Trust. We provide the Employment Pathway workstream through our ‘Pathways into…’ events which aims to empower veterans and their families, to thrive by ensuring equal access to employment opportunities and supporting them into sustainable, valuable careers.

 

Find out how Claudine Martin successfully set up her civvy street career in financial services with BNY Mellon after 17 years in the British Army. If Claudine’s journey inspires you, find out how a career in the financial services sector could work for you by registering to attend our Pathways into Financial Services event on 4 June in London!

In Claudine’s current role, she is the Executive Assistant to the Head of Pershing EMEA and also the Business Manager for the department. Think of her as a right-hand person and strategist rolled into one. She provides the head with comprehensive administrative support, ensuring their schedule runs smoothly and that they have everything they need to be successful.

The Forces Employment Charity spoke to Claudine to find out more about her experience.

What made you consider a career in this sector?

My decision to transition from the military stemmed from a desire to leverage my strong organisational skills in a fast-paced business environment. The opportunity to combine these skills with strategic thinking and contribute to the growth of a department greatly appealed to me. Having thrived in the structured environment of the Armed Forces, I was eager to test my abilities in a dynamic civilian setting, where I could continue to develop professionally.

Why choose BNY Mellon?

I chose BNY Mellon because of their fantastic culture and commitment to employee development. When I left the Armed Forces, I was concerned about not having a strong sense of community like what we have in the military. At BNY Mellon, I am fortunate to experience a genuine sense of belonging. The supportive and collaborative environment, which includes our Veteran Network, allows me to feel part of a team working towards shared goals. This sense of belonging has been instrumental in my successful integration and overall job satisfaction.

How do you feel your skills from the Armed Forces community converted across to your role?

Adaptability and problem-solving are equally valuable in the military and civilian sectors. My experience thinking on my feet, and finding creative solutions to challenges in the military, allows me to approach complex situations at BNY Mellon with a sense of calm and initiative.

What are your personal positives to your role?

Working in a dynamic organisation where there are opportunities to grow and learn every day is rewarding and fulfilling. In addition, I feel that my skills are transferable to the role and that my work and efforts are appreciated by my manager.

Any challenges – and how did you overcome them? (If any)

Transitioning from the military can be challenging. To navigate this process effectively, I adopted a proactive approach by actively attending industry insight days. Inevitably, some job applications were unsuccessful and at times I felt disappointed. However, I viewed these rejections as learning opportunities. Additionally, I secured an internship at a global investment bank. The internship allowed me to further develop my financial services acumen and strengthen my understanding of the industry. Ultimately my resilience and adaptability helped me secure my ideal role at BNY Mellon.

What tips would you share with anyone considering a role in financial services?

  • Network actively – attend industry events, connect with professionals on LinkedIn, and don’t be afraid to reach out
  • Be Persistent – the job search can be competitive. Don’t be put off by initial rejections. View them as learning opportunities and keep refining your CV and interview skills

Sign up to Pathways into Financial Services, and other events!

Register for Pathways into Financial Services today! Living in Scotland? We are also running a regional evening event in Glasgow at Barclays on Tuesday 18 June.

Consider also our fully funded LinkedIn Essentials course on Wednesday 5 June by Lincoln Coutts. Afterwards, you’ll be all set to build/refresh your own LinkedIn account!

Our ‘Pathways into…’ events are part of Op PROSPER

The Forces Employment Charity provides one of three workstreams of Op PROSPER; a government-led programme through the Office for Veterans’ Affairs, awarded to us through the Armed Forces Covenant Fund Trust. We provide the Employment Pathway workstream through our ‘Pathways into…’ events which aims to empower veterans and their families, the length and breadth of the United Kingdom, enabling them to thrive in society by ensuring equal access to employment opportunities and supporting them into sustainable, valuable careers.

 

One of the benefits of joining our next event, Pathways into Financial Services on 4 June in London is that you’ll be able to meet those who have served and hear about their own experiences in sourcing civilian employment. The Forces Employment Charity (FEC) met former British Army Officer, Alex Burns who is now a Vice President at BNY Mellon in its Digital Assets Business where his primary focus is on risk and controls.

Prior to joining BNY Mellon in September 2023, Alex was commissioned into the Rifles and spent seven years employed as an infantry officer within the British Army. Upon leaving the Army he secured a six-month contract in a Programme and Project Management role, before later joining the Digital Assets Business.

What made you consider a career in this sector?

During my year-long resettlement period, I was first introduced to financial services whilst attending the Advanced Management Achievement Course (AMAC) at Alliance Manchester Business School. It was here that I learnt more about the sector through academic modules and had the opportunity to spend a day in BNY Mellon’s Manchester office. Speaking to people who had recently made the transition from the military into financial services, reassured me that it was a viable career path and one that contained huge variety and opportunity.

Why choose BNY Mellon?

When narrowing down the vast number of potential employers during resettlement, I would assess first and foremost an organisation’s people and their culture. BNY Mellon has a fantastic culture, where people are happy to give up their time, for a quick coffee, and help educate and support others in their daily roles and career development.

How do you feel your skills from the Armed Forces community converted across to your role?

I hope that the diverse and commercially relevant skills that Service leavers bring to an organisation are becoming increasingly recognised. However, I think it was my personal resilience and experience of frequently changing roles every 6-12 months in the Army that helped me transition smoothly into my first civilian role in the bank.

What are your personal positives to your role?

Working in Digital Assets is incredibly exciting because we are only just beginning to understand the potential cryptocurrencies, digital cash, and tokenisation has to change the future of financial services. The rapidly changing landscape, the ability to meet clients’ needs with cutting-edge technology, and the opportunity to work with amazing people make it an ideal place for me.

Any challenges – and how did you overcome them? (If any)

Transitioning from the Armed Forces is not an easy task, and it can feel like you’re on a roller coaster. However, there is a wealth of support available to help overcome the challenges, including FEC career consultations, veteran advocacy groups, and networking events. I believe that many people can relate to this experience, and there are more than enough people willing to have a chat.

What tips would you share with anyone considering a role in financial services?

Embrace a growth mindset and be curious. At first, the amount of information to learn can seem daunting, but by networking and continuously learning, financial services becomes an increasingly fascinating sector to be a part of.

Sign up to Pathways into Financial Services, and other events!

Register for Pathways into Financial Services today! If you live in Scotland, we are also running a regional evening event in Glasgow at Barclays on Tuesday 18 June.

Consider also our fully funded LinkedIn Essentials course on Wednesday 5 June by Lincoln Coutts. Afterwards, you’ll be all set to build/refresh your own LinkedIn account!

 

The Warrior Programme is an immersive training experience designed to empower individuals by prioritising their emotional and psychological well-being. Through a series of intensive sessions over several days, participants are guided to confront personal challenges, develop resilience, and enhance self-awareness.  

Forces Employment Charity employee Cathrine Slaatta put it to the test and here’s what she discovered. 

“Over four intense days, I embarked on a journey that profoundly changed my perspective on life. Facilitated by The Warrior Programme, this emotional and psychological exploration left me with a newfound sense of self-awareness, resilience, and pride in my journey.”  

The programme, developed over fifteen years, addresses the unique demands faced by members of the Armed Forces, working with serving personnel, families of serving personnel, veterans, and their families.   

Michelle Chapman, a trainer at The Warrior Programme, elaborated on the programme’s approach:  

“My role is to guide people through a journey of self-exploration where they can better understand themselves. Working regularly with the Armed Forces community, it’s essential to grasp their individual challenges.” Watch Michelle in an interview at the Women into Employment 2024 event.  

Participants can choose between residential and online courses. Cathrine opted for the online course, sharing her experience as someone who struggled with anxiety and imposter syndrome.  

“One aspect that stood out to me was the programme’s commitment to creating a safe and open space. Unlike traditional settings, it embraced diverse learning styles, allowing participants to absorb knowledge at their own pace.”  

The journey of self-discovery involved various exercises, discussions, and reflections, facilitated by experienced coaches. Cathrine highlighted the importance of recognising oneself as a work in progress, a concept she initially found challenging.  

“The programme taught me that self-discovery is continuous, and every step forward deserves recognition.”  

Beyond personal growth, Cathrine learned valuable communication skills, empathy, and the significance of self-care.  

“As the days went on, I felt a growing sense of strength and confidence. However, it wasn’t without its challenges. By the end of each day, I often felt mentally exhausted as I delved into deep reflection. My mind was always switched on; consequently, using the techniques and tools they taught us, I was able to confront and navigate those long-ignored emotions and thoughts that once plagued my mind. Nonetheless, despite the fatigue, I persisted, recognising that each moment of discomfort was a necessary step toward personal growth.”

In need of support? 

The Warrior Programme, which is fully funded, offers a 12-month journey. It starts with a residential or online foundation course, followed by refresher sessions and online engagement.  

To embark on your transformative journey, visit The Warrior Programme website for more information and to register for their next course. Your path to resilience and a confident future begins today.  

If you are a Service leaver, veteran, reservist, or family member register with us to receive free employment support, including mentoring, at any stage in your career. 

Armed Forces Day is an annual national event that serves as a tribute to the men and women of the Armed Forces community. From active-duty personnel to veterans, from military families to cadets, this day is dedicated to honouring their courage, sacrifice, and unwavering commitment to protecting our nation’s security and upholding its values.  

Why is it important?  

Armed Forces Day is a symbol of national unity and gratitude. It allows communities nationwide to unite and express their support for those who serve and who have served. It’s a chance to recognise the sacrifices made by service members and their families and demonstrate solidarity and appreciation for their selfless dedication to duty.  

When is it?  

Armed Forces Day will be observed from 22 June to 7 July this year. During this period, various events and activities will take place nationwide to honour and celebrate the contributions of our Armed Forces community.  

Where will the Forces Employment Charity be?  

The Forces Employment Charity will actively participate in several events throughout the celebration. You can find them at:  

Additionally, the Forces Employment Charity will be extending its support to various employers on their own Armed Forces Day activities, including:  

  • Skanska Military Insight event  
  • Guys and St Thomas’s AFD event  
  • Deloitte Military Insight Day  
  • Citi and BlackRock Women into Finance event  
  • Make UK Skills networking event  
  • NetAcad UKI Expo 2024  
  • Ex-Forces in Business Awards  

Join us as we commemorate unity and resilience and express gratitude for the sacrifices made by members of the Armed Forces.  

For more information on Armed Forces Day events and how to get involved, visit the Armed Forces Day website and search for events in your area.  

To find out more about the work of the Forces Employment Charity, join our mailing list today.   

Imagery – ©UK MOD Crown Copyright 2022

At the Forces Employment Charity, we are committed to ensuring the voices of military families are heard. Therefore, we are excited to announce the launch of the Tri-Service Youth Voice Survey 2024, designed by young people for young people. Are you a young person aged 8 to 17, with one or both of your parents serving or have served? Then please help by completing this quick survey. 

Led by the Tri-Service Youth Voice Steering Group, the survey aims to gather the opinions of as many youth voices as possible. Whether you are addressing the challenges of frequent relocations, social barriers, accessing further education, or work opportunities, every voice matters. The survey is anonymous, ensuring young people may express themselves freely.  

The survey will capture military children’s perspectives, insights, and suggestions. After all, being a part of a Service family can have unique experiences and challenges. The voices of our military youth are vital in shaping the support services and initiatives provided to military families.  

Help us amplify the voices of our Armed Forces youth community by completing the survey today!  

 

Don’t miss out on the survey’s closing date, Friday 31 May 2024.  

If you want to be involved in your area’s youth voice, then please contact the MOD today 

In his role as Op NOVA National Manager, Colin Back is one of the UK’s most experienced experts on veteran affairs in the health and justice sector. Commissioned by the NHS and delivered by the Forces Employment Charity, Op NOVA is a support service for veterans in contact with the justice system. 

An Army veteran and former police officer, Colin brings a wealth of sector experience to the Op NOVA senior leadership team.  It was while working in the Kent Police Volume Crime Unit that Colin first identified the veteran community as a specific cohort transitioning through the custody suites. This led Colin in 2009 to pioneer and trial an early intervention scheme to support veterans at the point of arrest working in conjunction with a SSAFA caseworker. 

In 2011, Colin joined the Forces Employment Charity as a Prison in Reach Support Worker, providing him with a 360-degree perspective of the veteran’s journey through the justice system.  

Project NOVA

Building on Colin’s cumulative experience, he went on to set up and later become the National Manager of the Forces Employment Charity’s Project NOVA programme in 2014, a new initiative to provide a framework that would both identify veterans at the point of arrest and actively support them to access and engage with locally delivered support.  

The need for a veteran-specific support programme in the justice system was increasingly evident, and in 2015 the Government published the Phillips Report, which reinforced the premise of Project NOVA. 

“The Phillips Report exposed the hidden reality of veterans in the justice system and underlined the need for greater awareness of veteran identity and life experiences in the sector” explains Colin. 

Driving Sustainable change: From Project NOVA to Op NOVA

In 2022 NHS England commissioned the Forces Employment Charity to deliver Op NOVA, a comprehensive support service for veterans in England in contact with the justice system.  

This commission saw Op NOVA supersede Project NOVA, incorporating the programme into the NHS’s dedicated veteran support portfolio:

Colin remains at the operational helm of the Op NOVA programme, working closely with NHS England, the FEC’s senior leadership team and Board of Trustees. 

Although integral to the strategic and operational development of OP NOVA, Colin’s core values remain rooted in veteran welfare and championing the contributions of the caseworkers: 

“Veterans are incredibly proud people and do not generally ask for help, although our work proves that once identified and supported, the outcomes for veterans in the justice system are significantly improved … the Op NOVA caseworkers do a fantastic job, their work is both life-changing and, in many instances, life-saving” says Colin. 

The scale of support available through Op NOVA is extensive and has positive impacts for the individual veteran, their families, local communities, and the entire justice system. 

In 2015 we supported a Prolific and Priority Offender (PPO)

This veteran was about to leave prison, we met with him 12 weeks prior to his release. His needs assessment identified that his two main concerns were employment and housing. This was his seventeenth custodial sentence since leaving the Services. It was also his final sentence, and he has not since reoffended. Upon his release from Prison, Op NOVA worked with him to secure both accommodation and employment.

The police analyst estimated that his offending behaviour was costing the taxpayer over £400,000 based on his previous 18 months of interaction with the justice system. 

Op NOVA generates this life-changing impact through a full package of support, comprising health, finances, legal, lifestyle, and employment support.  

What’s next for Op NOVA?

Op NOVA is now entering its second phase of delivery, with greater coverage across England’s police and probation departments. Importantly, Op NOVA is also being extended to every prison in England throughout 2024. The Forces Employment Charity has subcontracted this ‘in-prison’ aspect of work to Care After Combat. 

“I’m incredibly proud of how much Op NOVA has already achieved and believe that the foundations are in place for sustained impact. The evidence base for Op NOVA is constantly growing and I’m keen to strengthen our collaborations with justice practitioners for the benefit of veterans, communities, and society as a whole” says Colin. 

Follow Op NOVA on social media

Contact the Op NOVA team

 

 

Young People’s Caseworker, Sian Kerr at the Forces Employment Charity, has compiled her top tips for creating a stellar CV to help the military community articulate their skills and experiences. Our advisors support you at every step of your journey and can help you develop interview techniques and build your personal brand.

Register for our services for employment support.

Your CV is a digital representation of you! Think about what you want it to say.

Many companies use AI to filter through CVs. To ensure AI filters don’t overlook your CV, avoid using text boxes, complex formatting, or images. Keep it simple!

Want to read the full article?

Log in to MyForcesEmployment

Join us as we cover our advice on how to write a good CV including:

  • Which format to use
  • How to talk about your work experience
  • Deciding what to include
  • Using references

Register to gain full access to our job-seeker guides which can help you write a winning cover letter, teach you how to negotiate your salary, develop your commercial awareness, and much more.

Want to hear about our programmes, partnerships, events and ways that we could support you?
JOIN OUR MAILING LIST